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Plainfield board members sworn in; Fay honored

Brock A. Stein | 5/5/2015, 9:31 a.m.
Bill Lambs starts his third term on the Plainfield Village Board, joined by newcomers Ed O'Rourke and Brian Wojowski.
Plainfield Trustee Paul Fay, who opted not to run for re-election in April, is recognized for his service by Mayor Michael Collins at his final village board meeting. Brock A. Stein

New Plainfield Village Board Trustee Ed O'Rourke is sworn in by Will County Judge Dan Rippy, a former board trustee.

New Plainfield Village Board Trustee Ed O'Rourke is sworn in by Will County Judge Dan Rippy, a former board trustee.

Brian Wojowski, a New Lenox police officer elected to his first term on the village board, takes the oath of office administered by Judge Dan Rippy, a Plainfield resident.

Brian Wojowski, a New Lenox police officer elected to his first term on the village board, takes the oath of office administered by Judge Dan Rippy, a Plainfield resident.

Bill Lamb started his third term on the Plainfield Village Board Monday night after being sworn in by Judge Dan Rippy.

Bill Lamb started his third term on the Plainfield Village Board Monday night after being sworn in by Judge Dan Rippy.

Two new members were welcomed to the Plainfield Village Board Monday night.

Former Plan Commission member Ed O'Rourke and New Lenox police officer Brian Wojowski were sworn in to their first terms and incumbent Trustee Bill Lamb to his third. All three were sworn in to office by former Trustee Dan Rippy, who left office in November after winning a 12th District circuit court judgeship.

Former Trustee Paul Fay, who opted not to run for a fourth term, was honored by the mayor and board for his 12 years of service to the village.

Trustee Jim Racich said that to the casual observer, serving as a trustee seems like an easy job. The time commitments, however, go beyond attending the Monday night meetings and include a variety of other tasks, including leading committees, studying issues and engaging with residents.

"People do not realize how much effort it is to be a trustee for that length of time," Racich said of Fay's tenure. "It will be a loss for the village of Plainfield not to have you on this board."

Mayor Michael Collins said Fay's service was a sign of his dedication to Plainfield, where he focused on park and open space conservation and his work to create useable public space along the DuPage River.

"He's done a wonderful job over the years," said Collins, who presented Fay with a plaque in commemoration of his time on the board.

Fay congratulated the incoming trustees, reminding them of their primary jobs as trustees.

"First and foremost, your role is a public servant," said Fay. "Always remember that."

In other business, the board approved the purchase of 345 tons of road salt from Midwest Salt for just over $29,000. The purchase represents the start of the village's restocking of salt stores for the upcoming winter and an oversupply of a delivery made in November.

Public Works Director Allen Persons said the cost represented a discount rate of $85 per ton after discussions with the supplier on the fair market value of the salt.

A snafu with the state of Illinois salt purchase program sent the village scrambling to secure salt bids in July last year. The village paid $107 per ton in 2014 after receiving a state bid rate of $57 per ton in 2013.

Persons said the village plans to return to the state bid program this year for the first round bids. The village has about 6,000 tons of salt on hand and needs about 3,500 tons more, he said.

Contact Brock A. Stein at brocknewstips@gmail.com or on Twitter at BrockAStein.