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“The Face That Changed It All” Interview with Kam Williams

10/28/2015, 9:20 p.m.
Beverly Johnson rose to fame in August of 1974 when she made history as the first African-American to grace on ...

For photo of Beverly on her book cover, visit: http://astore.amazon.com/thslfofire-20/images/1476774412

For a photo of Beverly at 18 with her mother, see attachment

From Career to Cosby, Beverly Bares It All!

Beverly Johnson rose to fame in August of 1974 when she made history as the first African-American to grace on the cover of Vogue magazine. The multi-talented supermodel/actress/businesswoman/author has enjoyed an enduring career which has included writing a several books and starring in her own reality-TV series, "Beverly's Full House."

Recently, she has bravely stepped forward as the highest-profile victim to accuse Bill Cosby of drugging and assaulting her. Here, she talks about that incident as well as her new autobiography, “The Face That Changed It All.”

Kam Williams: Hi Beverly, thanks for another interview.

Beverly Johnson: Hi, Kam. Thanks for reviewing the book and for including a picture of me and my mother. I appreciate that. I really do. You know show she has Alzheimer's. [Wipes away tears]

KW: No, I didn't. I'm sorry to hear that. What interested you in writing your autobiography?

BJ: I'm not the type of girl who cries a lot, but I'm crying right now because I don't know whether I'd written it, if my mother hadn't developed Alzheimer's. There are many things in the book that I know would've caused her a lot of pain, and I wouldn't want to do that to her. When you think about trying to reduce a life of 60 years to 250 pages, it's a little overwhelming.

KW: How did you go about deciding what to include?

BJ: Basically, what I did was break it up into childhood, Seventies and Eighties. I kinda bit off half of it. It was also important to me as an African-American to write this because we've had a very painful history, and haven't passed our stories down, perhaps out of shame. I know that in growing I would grab onto any little anecdote my mother or grandmother might leak out by accident. I believe that we should tell our stories, because they're important for the future generations. So, I want to make sure I leave my story, even though it isn't all pleasant. I don't want anyone to pass away with their song still inside them. That's really why I decided to write my memoirs.

KW: Marcia Evans says: I love sistah Beverly Johnson! I am wondering if you have been blessed with another grandchild by your daughter, Anansa?

BJ: Yes, I have three grandchildren: 4 year-old Ava; 2 year-old David, and a 1 year-old. And I have the son I always wanted in my son-in-law, David Patterson. They're the most remarkable parents I've ever known. I always tell my daughter that she's such a better mother than I was. It's incredible how involved they are with their kids on a day-in, day-out basis.


KW: She says: I still frequently refer to your amazing first book "True Beauty" about the natural health regimen you lived by. I would love to see you do another reality series but with a different format than the one you had on the Oprah Winfrey Network. Perhaps you could do a beauty talk show enlightening younger folks about class and beauty.