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Residents protest Trump Bolingbrook visit

Brock A. Stein | 9/28/2016, 4:04 p.m.
Residents came out to protest Donald Trump's fundraising luncheon at the Bolingbrook Golf Club on Wednesday.
Alberto Rosas protests Donald Trump's visit to the Bolingbrook Golf Club on September 28. Brock A. Stein

Bolingbrook resident Patty Droogan had spent about a month organizing a protest against Donald Trump’s visit to Bolingbrook Wednesday.

The volunteer for Suburban Families Against Hate had extra time since the event was originally set for September 12, was later postponed for the 19th before Wednesday’s visit by the Republican nominee for President. Trump’s visit to the Bolingbrook Golf Club was at the invitation of Mayor Roger Claar though the mayor did not return calls to comment.

Droogan said that she was moved to organize the event after hearing more and more of Trump’s vitriolic statements against minority groups and women.

“It’s about what he stands for,” said Droogan who said she’s sick of hearing the candidate’s “misogyny.”

Video

Suburban Families Against Hate rally

Marc Lovell, a Bolingbrook resident, talks about why its important to speak out against hateful rhetoric.

Marc Lovell, a Bolingbrook resident, talks about why its important to speak out against hateful rhetoric.

“I’ve had enough of men like Donald Trump,” she said.

Many of the groups that Trump has castigated from Latinos, Muslims and women during his campaign stump speeches came out for the protest which was staged across Rodeo Drive from the entrance to the golf course.

Mark Knutson, of Joliet, said that he thinks that Trump has brought out the worst in certain parts of the American electorate.

“I don’t think he’s a good role model,” said Knutson.

Trump’s visit, a campaign fundraiser being held for $1000 per plate and up, wasn’t the most egregious aspect of his visit for 43-year resident Ruby Lofton who said that she was especially disappointed that he was invited by Mayor Claar.

Video

Tyree Johnson on 'Fight for $15'

Tyree Johnson talks about the importance of a living wage at the Suburban Families Against Hate rally on Sept. 28.

Tyree Johnson talks about the importance of a living wage at the Suburban Families Against Hate rally on Sept. 28.

“I don’t like it all,” said Lofton.

Resident Norman Brown agrees that Trump’s campaign rhetoric has been divisive and was disappointed that he was invited by the mayor.

“It’s very diverse here, and we do not need Donald Trump here,” said Brown.

Resident Theresa Moore was also unhappy being kept behind a barrier from the public golf course. She is most displeased with Trump keeping his tax returns a secret but said that its one among many problems she has with the candidate.

“I have a lot of gripes,” she said of Trump, “The man is unintelligent.”

Trump’s motorcade arrived with little fanfare along King’s Road, avoiding the protestors chants of “dump Trump, dump Claar.”

Marc Lovell, who’s lived in Bolingbrook since 1986, said that voters should be wary of anything that Trump promises in the lead up to the November 8 election.

“Everything that Donald Trump says is a falsehood,” said Lovell, “I don’t believe anything he says.”

Not everyone at the event came to protest. Plainfield resident Curt Mikkelsen said that he likes Trump’s business credentials and thinks that if he does become president that he will lead the country on a more “constitutional basis.”