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Avoid lead poisoning in children

3/1/2017, 6 a.m.
A full 50 years after the research of Clair Cameron Patterson on the dangers of lead took off in the ...

A full 50 years after the research of Clair Cameron Patterson on the dangers of lead took off in the 60s, there are still many dangers out there. Yes, unleaded fuel has been the norm for many years. But there are still other ways for the body to develop poisoning by inhaling or absorbing lead.

One of the most common problems is old paint in homes. Although no homes built after 1978 are supposed to have lead paint, a lot of older ones still do. Will County Health Department Childhood Lead program manager Lyyti Dudczyk says one of the easiest ways to handle old lead paint is to simply paint over it. But if the old lead-based paint is peeling, then you have a problem.

“There is now a law,” Dudczyk said “that if a contractor is doing even a little project in a home built before 1978, they have to check for lead and take numerous precautions. But what we have seen many times is do-it-yourselfers just scraping away peeling paint, and not realizing that their children are inhaling lead dust as the chips of paint lie on the floor.”