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Update: Joliet City Council passes changes to pet sale ordinance

Brock A. Stein | 11/21/2017, 12:47 p.m. | Updated on 11/21/2017, 8:30 p.m.
The City Council's vote disappointed some residents who wanted to see animals sold in stores come from rescue organizations.
Critics say that animals that come from production farms, sometimes known as "mills," are treated inhumanely.

Update 11/21/17, 8:20 p.m. The Joliet City Council has passed an ordinance that will allow the continued sale of puppies through pet stores.

The council reviewed two versions on Monday night. Version A would have mirrored an ordinance passed in Chicago that requires stores to sell animals acquired through rescue operations.

The council voted to pass version B which will set stricter guidelines for sales of pets including setting a minimum age of 8 weeks to remove a puppy from its mother and requiring that animals be obtained from a “USDA licensed breeder, a humane society or rescue, or a hobby breeder.”

Council woman Jan Quillman was the lone ‘no’ vote against passing version B.

Quillman said that she was disappointed that the council didn’t support passing version A of the measure which she said would have been another step toward closing down outlets for disreputable large-scale breeders to sell their dogs.

Quillman said that version A was never about putting any pet stores out of business but would have changed where they obtained their puppies.

Council members Larry Hug who voted for version B said that the two sides’ “disagreement is on the solution” and that all wanted to see disreputable breeders put out of business.

“B is the right choice,” said Hug.

Joliet resident Peggy Grandahl said that she was "dissappinted but not surprised" by the board's vote.

11/20/17

This week, Joliet’s City Council is set to vote on one of two ordinance changes that could impact where residents get their next furry friend.

During Monday’s pre-council meeting, The city council considered two proposed amendments to its Animals and Fowl ordinance that oversees the sale of dogs and cats within the city.

Version A of the ordinance mirrors a change made by the City of Chicago that restricts dog and cat sales at pet stores to those animals obtained through rescues and other animal welfare organizations.

Version B would set stricter guidelines for sales of pets including setting a minimum age of 8 weeks to remove a puppy from its mother and requiring that animals be obtained from a “USDA licensed breeder, a humane society or rescue, or a hobby breeder.”

Joliet resident Peggy Grandahl said that she supported version A of the amendment arguing that she doesn’t support breeding animals for profit.

“You don’t breed them to make money. You breed them for companionship, for good health” and for skills that some breeds offer like bomb detection, search and rescue as well as those that serve as comfort animals and seeing eyes, she said.

“They can fit in to your family but they aren’t an impulse buy from the mall,” said Grandahl who said that at one time, she too bought a pet at a pet store before she realized the large-scale breeding operations they supported and the needs found in area shelters.

“Today we know better and today we can do better by those animals,” she said.

Joliet resident Robert Hernandez said he believes that people should be able to make the choice for themselves where they get their pets. He said he’s had pets that he’s adopted and those that he’s gotten from pet stores. Those from the stores were just as healthy and well-adjusted he said.