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British forensic expert will offer opinion on Semaj Crosby murder

Brock A. Stein | 10/4/2017, 4:35 p.m.
A British journalist, author and forensic evidence consultant has agreed to look in to the case of slain Joliet toddler ...
Semaj ML Crosby Will Co Sheriff's office

A British journalist, author and forensic evidence consultant has agreed to look in to the case of slain Joliet toddler Sema’j Crosby.

Satish Sekar will research and release an opinion in the case according to a recent post on the Daily Kos website.

“Since 1990 Sekar has specialized in the investigation of miscarriages of justice,” the post read.

16-month old Sema’j Crosby was reported missing on April 23 and was found dead under a couch in her home on Louis Rd. in Joliet Township 2 days later.

A coroner’s report released in September ruled her death as a homicide caused by asphyxia.

No person of interest or suspect has been announced and no arrests have been made in connection to her death though the Will County Sheriff’s office in a statement has said that the case remains “the highest priority” and that “all available resources are being deployed in this investigation.”

Since her death, there have been calls for reforms at the Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS) which visited the Crosby home hours before her disappearance and noted the deplorable conditions of the property.

A group of concerned residents calling itself the Justice for Sema’j Action Committee has kept the case in the public consciousness with monthly meetings with law enforcement and community members. The group has also petitioned the Joliet Park District to rename Oak Valley Park in her memory.

According to the website, Sekar has worked on a number of high-profile cases in the United Kingdom and is the Executive Director and Founder of The Fitted-In Project which is dedicated to criminal justice system reforms.

In a statement, Sekar said that “Semaj Crosby was let down badly in her short life” and that her death could have been avoided.

“She can't speak for herself any longer, but forensic science can,” he said. “Justice must prevail.”