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Joliet police purchase laser crime scene mapping system

Brock A. Stein | 10/4/2017, 3:39 p.m.
The City of Joliet police department will purchase a new 3D crime scene evidence collection system with the assistance from ...

The City of Joliet police department will purchase a new 3D crime scene evidence collection system with the assistance from the Will County State’s Attorney’s office.

The two agencies will split the cost of the new $86,000 Faro 3D system, which is expected to cut the time to process crime and crash site scenes by about 66%.

State’s attorney Jim Glasgow said Tuesday that the new technology will also be more accurate, creating a 3D image of crime scenes that can be presented to juries allowing for multiple viewpoints including a bird’s eye view floating above the scene.

In addition, the scanning system will also be capable of analyzing blood spatter evidence.

“This stuff will be totally locked in with the 3D scanner,” said Glasgow.

For auto crashes, he said that the quicker turnaround time will allow for shorter traffic interruptions and reduce the number of hours officers have to process a scene.

He said that the new technology will not only document the scene of a crash it will also produce a movie of the events.

“It’s incredible,” he said.

Police Chief Brian Benton said that the system will be purchased using drug forfeiture funds. He said that the state’s attorney’s office contribution allowed the department to move up its timetable to purchase the system this year instead of in 2018.

Council member Larry Hug said Monday that the system will give the city’s police department the ability to do more with their resources under always tightening budgets.

“We have to do more with what we have,” said Hug.

In other business, the city council this week also approved the police department’s request to purchase 25 Tasers at a cost of just over $52,000. A city memo notes that the department purchased its first Tasers in 2010 to help reduce injuries to its officers and offenders.

The memo also notes that Tasers have a 5-year lifespan and that the current purchase would replace and be upgrades for some of the department’s aging units.