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Rep. Welter statement on passage of Graduated Tax amendment

5/29/2019, 6 a.m.
State Representative David Allen Welter, R-Morris, issued the following statement following the passage of legislation placing a constitutional amendment referendum ...

State Representative David Allen Welter, R-Morris, issued the following statement following the passage of legislation placing a constitutional amendment referendum to enact a graduated tax on the November 2020 General Election ballot today:

"An overwhelming number of Illinois families don't trust the legislature to do much. They don't trust us to protect children in the state's care because we have failed them all too often; they don't trust that we're actually spending lottery revenue on education because that was a shell game with Illinois taxpayers; they don't trust us to fully fund pensions because for too long we took holidays and shorted the funds and we're about to do it again this year under the Governor's proposed budget. They don't trust us because of the corruption we have allowed to flourish in Illinois; like teach for a day and receive a pension for life. Four governors elected since 1960 have gone to prison. No other state can match that.

The facts are clear. Based on official numbers from the Department of Revenue, we have the money to pass a balanced budget with no tax increases and no cuts to essential social service programs that we all care about. Illinois does not need, and our taxpayers cannot afford, a graduated income tax. Passing this amendment sends the wrong message to working families and job creators in Illinois. Make no mistake - Governor Pritzker's candid admission that he cannot give any guarantees that there won't be more changes to the rates means higher taxes on middle-income earners in the not-too-distant future should the graduated tax become law. I chose to stand with the taxpayers of Grundy, Kendall, LaSalle and Will Counties by voting No."

The legislation is Senate Joint Resolution Constitutional Amendment #1. It was previously approved by the State Senate on May 1 along party lines in a vote of 40-19.